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  • February 2024

    by Casey Samson February 09, 2024 4 min read 3 Comments

     February has gracefully arrived, ushering in a wave of excitement and promising new ventures for both the dedicated team at Samson Historical and history enthusiasts alike! This illustrious month holds a special significance in our hearts, marking the birth of the esteemed Founding Father, George Washington. As we embark on a new month's journey, we are diligently working to complete the renovations of Samson Historical's new storefront nestled in the heart of downtown Lebanon, IN. February not only brings forth historical milestones but also invites us to savor precious moments with our loved ones during the celebration of the modern holiday, Valentine's Day. It is a time for reflection as we immerse ourselves in living history events, allowing us to connect with the past on a profound level. In the spirit of sharing, we are thrilled to present this newsletter, offering a delightful blend of knowledge from both the new and old years. Here's to a February filled with historical richness and cherished moments!

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    CELEBRATING THE LEAP YEAR

    2024 is a Leap Year! We welcome the 29th day of February with open arms and wish you all the best use of your additional 24 hours. Did you know that one of the most significant years in American history was also a Leap Year? That's right, 1776 was also 366 days long! While we don't anticipate the birth of a nation in 2024, we certainly hope it is
    just as prosperous!

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    Happiest of Birthdays, Aria!

    Happy Birthday to our incredibly talented seamstress, Aria! Your skillful hands bring history to life through every stitch, creating authentic and beautiful garments that transport us to another time. On this special day, may your thread always be smooth, your needles sharp, and your creativity boundless. May your year ahead be filled with joy, inspiration, and the satisfaction of creating more stunning pieces that captivate and delight. Happy Birthday!

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    Spotting a Special Guest

    This week we completed a photoshoot for our 2024 Catalog. We are looking forward to sharing new imagery that breathes life into the fine craftsmanship of the 18th Century which we so diligently work to replicate. Perhaps just as exciting, among the faces captured will be one that is familiar to much of our audience. Be sure to subscribe to our catalog, entirely free, and take a look to see if you can name our guest collaboration!

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    Mark Your Calendars to Save!

    Each year, we celebrate President's Day with offers of unparalleled savings. Enjoy 15% your entire order on February 18th, 2024, and February 19th, 2024.

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    The Business of Marriage

    While love has transcended the centuries, the business of marriage looked quite a bit different in the 18th Century than what we know today. Keep an eye out for our upcoming blog about the legalities of love.

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    232 Years Ago This Month
    The Postal Service Act

    On February 20, 1792, President George Washington officially created the modern United States Postal Service by signing a sweeping act that promoted a free press and put privacy safeguards in place. The Postal Service Act reinforced the power of Congress to establish specific mail routes, stipulated the right to privacy, and guaranteed the inexpensive delivery of all newspapers. Access to information and communication was undeniably significant for those living in the newly established United States of America. The postmaster general’s position was considered a plum patronage post for political allies of the president until the Postal Service was transformed into a corporation run by a board of governors in 1971.

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    SEIGE OF FORT VINCENNES

    On the morning of February 25, 1779, Lieutenant Colonel George Rogers Clark, elder brother of explorer William Clark, accepted British Lt. Gov. Henry Hamilton's unconditional surrender of Fort Sackville
    at Vincennes, Indiana.

    Clark and his contingent of 170 men set out on February 5th from Kaskaskia toward what is now Vincennes, Indiana. The 180 mile journey was fraught with peril. More often than not the men were walking through flooded plains, sometimes actively flowing with water several inches deep. By February 20th the provisions had run out and the there were still several days to go until they were to
    reach For Sackville.

    On February 20th five hunters from Vincennes were taken prisoner while traveling by boat. They informed Clark that his army remained undetected and that many of the citizens around the fort remained loyal to the patriot cause. Clark sent a man ahead of the group with a letter to the people of Vincennes. This detailed that the army would arrive soon and they should remain in their homes or be considered an enemy. The correspondence was read publicly in the town square, none of the citizens warned Hamilton of the impending attack.

    Sunset on February 23rd, Clark and his troops marched into Vincennes and several were sent ahead to begin firing upon the fort. Despite this, Hamilton was unaware of the attack until a bullet through a window struck one of his men. During this time Clark and his men had built an entrenchment and locals provided the Americans with ammunition and powder that had been hidden from the British. In addition the Piankeshaw and Kickapoo tribes allied with Clarks troops.

    February 24th Clark sent a message into the fort demanding surrender, which Hamilton declined. Aided by the Kickapoo allies, Clark’s men captured part of British-allied war party. He then ordered the 5 native captives killed before the fort. This terrified the British and created a rift between the brutish and their native allies.

    The plan worked and Hamilton surrendered. At 10:00 a.m. on February 25th, the garrison of 79 men marched out of the fort and Clark’s men raised the American flag and renamed the fortification Fort Patrick Henry.

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    KALAMAZOO LIVING HISTORY SHOW

    The next event out on the road is the Kalamazoo Living History Show in Kalamazoo, MI. This is truly a mall of early America type of event. Hundreds of quality vendors and thousands of items to purchase. Being from Indiana, we describe the set up and tear down at this event like being on a pit crew. There are very limited hours for both so we set up a dry run ahead of time for practice! This is also the first time new items for the year are available in person.

    3 Responses

    Norman Gerring
    Norman Gerring

    March 02, 2024

    Fine news letter. Looking forward to catalog. Thanks!

    Chris Sollars
    Chris Sollars

    February 09, 2024

    It’s nice to be a part of your business,I’ve been into Living History since I was 4. Now at 47 I can appreciate it more.Love the news letter,it looks sweet too. Can’t wait to get my Dog striker.

    Hugh Toenjes
    Hugh Toenjes

    February 09, 2024

    Love your news letter! Where did you come up with the name “Red Lion”? Please keep publishing history’s news! It’s exciting!!

    Leave a comment


    Also in The Red Lion News-Letter

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    by Casey Samson March 01, 2024 4 min read

    March is an exciting time each year here at Samson Historical. For us, it means the catalog has gone to the printers and will soon be in the mail to all of you. It also means that we are chomping at the bit to get out and stretch some canvas. Though we are still a little while out for that, we do have the Kalamazoo Living History show to give us that first taste of a market fair.
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    January 2024
    January 2024

    by Casey Samson January 03, 2024 3 min read 5 Comments

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